FUNGAL DETERIORATION OF SOME EDIBLE FRUITS AND THEIR BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES OF AMYLASE PRODUCTION.

Authors

  • Manisha Mandal
  • Subrata Mitra

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4152899

Keywords:

Cucumber, Pomegranate, Lemon, Fusarium, Aspergillus, Amylase

Abstract

Production of microbial enzymes at the industrial scale and their commercialization has gained a lot of focus and importance. Some of the industrially important enzymes from microbial origin include Lipase, Amylase, Proteases, Xylanases, Pectinases. The current work involves the use of fungi isolated from the decaying fruit for extraction of amylase. The organism were isolated from decayed fruit were cultured in modified CZ agar (soluble starch used instead of sucrose) plate as the isolation of fungi. The organisms were screened for the production of amylase using modified CZ media. Microscopic identification, isolation and morphology study revealed that the fungi isolated were Fusarium sp., Aspergillus niger, Unidentified fungal fruit rotter, Aspergillus candidus, A. flavus. Qualitative estimation and quantitative estimation of amylase were done. The results they obtained can conclude that the use of Fusarium sp., Aspergillus niger and Unidentified fungul fruit rotter are highly beneficial for the production of amylase.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Bilgrami, K.S., Sinha, K.K. 1983. Chemical changes in dry fruits during the aflatoxin elaboration by Aspergillus flavus Link. Ex Fries. Curr. Sci. 52: 960-963.

Chaudhary Manjari, Kaur Manajeet and Deshpande, K. B. 1980. Biochemical changes during fruit rot of apple. Indian Phytopath. 33: 331-332.

Coates, L., & Johnson, G. (1997). Postharvest diseases of fruit and vegetables. Plant pathogens and plant diseases, 533-548.

Cochrane, V.W., 1958. Physiology of fungi. John Wiley and Sons., Inc., Newyork. Pp. 13-19.

Deverall, b. j., 1965. The physical environment for fungal growth in ‘The fungi’. An advanced treatise, vol.I: 543-550, (Eds. G. C. Ainsworth and A. S. Sussman). Academic Press, New York.

Fush, Y., Pesis, E. and Zanberman, G. 1980. Changes in mango fruits pulp. Scientia Horticulture. 13: 55-160.

Gadgile, D.P. 2011. Studies on post-harvest diseases of mango fruits. Ph.D. Thesis.Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad (M.S.), India.

McManus, P. S. (2001). Cranberry fruit rot diseases in Wisconsin. ( No. A3745). University of Wisconsin-Madison: Cooperative Extension Publishing.

Pandey, R. M., Rao, M.N. and Singh, R.N. 1974. Biochemical changes in the developing mango fruits (Mangifera indica L.) c.v.Dasheri. Prog.Hort. 5: 47-59

Reddy, S. M. and Laxminarayana, P. 1984. Post infection changes in ascorbic acid contents of mango and amla caused by two fruit-rot fungi. Curr. Sci. 53: 927-928.

Sangeetha, G., Usharani, S., & Muthukumar, A. 2009. Biocontrol with Trichoderma species for the managment of postharvest crown rot of banana. Phytopathologia Mediterranea, 48(2), 214-225.

Sawant, S. G. and Gawai, D. U. 2011. Effect of fungal infections on nutritional value of papaya fruits. Curr. Bot. 2: 43-44.

Sawant, S. G. and Gawai, D. U. 2011a. biochemical changes in banana fruits due to postharvest fungal pathogens. Curr Bot. 2: 41-42.

Singh Anjana and Sinha, K.K. 1982. Biochemical changes in musambi fruits inoculated with species of aflatoxin producing Aspergilli. Curr. Sci. 51: 841-842.

Tandon, R. N., 1961. Physiological studies on some pathogenic fungi. Uttar Pradesh Scientific Research Committee Monographs, Allahabad, India.

Tendon , R. N. 1970. Certain problems of post harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables. Indian Phytopath. 13: 1-15.

Published

2020-10-30

How to Cite

[1]
M. Mandal and S. Mitra, “FUNGAL DETERIORATION OF SOME EDIBLE FRUITS AND THEIR BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES OF AMYLASE PRODUCTION.”, FASJ, vol. 1, no. 4, Oct. 2020.